War and Peace

War and Peace

1869

War and Peace broadly focuses on Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812 and follows three of the most well-known characters in literature: Pierre Bezukhov, the illegitimate son of a count who is fighting for his inheritance and yearning for spirit...

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NovelHistorical FictionRomancePhilosophical fiction

1296 Pages
4.3

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Book Content


War and Peace broadly focuses on Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812 and follows three of the most well-known characters in literature: Pierre Bezukhov, the illegitimate son of a count who is fighting for his inheritance and yearning for spiritual fulfillment; Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, who leaves his family behind to ...

War and is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, published serially, then in its entirety in 1869. It is regarded as one of Tolstoy's finest literary achievements.

Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy  (September 1828 – 20 November 1910), usually referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer who is regarded as one of the greatest authors of all time.

He received multiple nominations for Nobel Prize in Literature every year from 1902 to 1906

and nominations for Nobel Peace Prize in 1901, 1902 and 1910, and the fact that he never won is a major Nobel prize controversy.War and Peace broadly focuses on Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and follows three of the most well-known characters in literature: Pierre Bezukhov, the illegitimate son of a count who is fighting for his inheritance and yearning for spiritual fulfillment; Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, who leaves his family behind to fight in the war against Napoleon; and Natasha Rostov, the beautiful young daughter of a nobleman who intrigues both men.

 

A s Napoleon’s army invades, Tolstoy brilliantly follows characters from diverse backgrounds—peasants and nobility, civilians and soldiers—as they struggle with the problems unique to their era, their history, and their culture. And as the novel progresses, these characters transcend their specificity, becoming some of the most moving—and human—figures in world literature.

 

Chapters:

BOOK 1: 1805 (28 chapters)

BOOK 2: 1805 (21 chapters)

BOOK 3: 1805 (19 chapters)

BOOK 4: 1806 (16 chapters)

BOOK 5: 1806 – 07 (22 chapters)

BOOK 6: 1808 – 10 (26 chapters)

BOOK 7: 1810 – 11 (13 chapters)

BOOK 8: 1811 – 12(22 chapters)

BOOK 9: 1812 (29 chapters)

BOOK 10: 1812 (39 chapters)

BOOK 11: 1812 (34 chapters)

BOOK 12: 1812 (16 chapters)

BOOK 13: 1812 (19 chapters)

BOOK 14: 1812 (19 chapters)

BOOK 15: 1812 – 13 (20 chapters)

EPILOGUE 1: 1813 – 20 (16 chapters)

EPILOGUE 2 (12 chapters)

Review:

 

eli.thegreenplace.net

This is the second time I've read this book. The first was a copy I borrowed a few years ago, and now I've purchased one for my own library. I try to collect good books I really loved reading, and "War an peace" easily falls into this category.

 

It is an epic novel in the truest sense of "epic". Stretching over a period of several decades, it masterfully describes the history of Russia from the end of the 18th century and into the first third of the 1800s. At more than 1600 pages, it is definitely one of the longest novels out there, but unlike many much shorter books, its length is well justified. I can barely count on the fingers of one hand the amount of times I felt some section is too long. Although Tolstoy is very thorough, his writing is easily readable and the pages just fly.

 

The books focuses on two main topics. One is the Russian-French wars of 1805 and 1812. Tolstoy describes the wars, and in particular the battles of Austerlitz (1805) and Borodino (1812) in vivid detail and apparently very accurately from a historic point of view. The characters of Napoleon and Kutuzov (the Russian army leader) take active part in the narration, with the lesser leaders (Bagration, de Tolli, Davoux) also getting enough attention to build a complete and interesting story. Specific events of the war are highlighted with the participation of the book's main characters, like Andrey Bolkonsky, Nikolay Rostov and Pierre Bezoukhov.

 

The other is the high Russian society of that time. The book provides a very interesting and in-depth glimpse into this unusual society by today's standards, somewhat modeled after, and thus similar to, other European societies (French, British, etc.). Tolstoy also presents the life in rural Russia a little, and the interrelations between the rich and the serfs, although he doesn't spend on this topic nearly as much as in Anna Karenina.

 

The characters in the book are various and present the different ideas Tolstoy tries to infuse into his narration. They are all, without exception, extremely believable and well developed. I can't think of many authors who know how to present and develop their characters as well as Tolstoy.

 

Additionally, the book presents plenty of interesting philosophical and scientific ("science of history") ideas. The chief one is undoubtedly the question "What causes and shapes historical events?". Contrary to the popular dogma that historical events are the result of actions of single notable persons (such as Napoleon or king Alexander), Tolstoy believes that such persons don't really cause events, but rather can only affect them in some ways once they are already in existence. He claims that what really changes history is the amalgam of human actions, built from thousands, nay, millions of small decisions, desires and ambitions of the people. A historical version of chaos theory.

 

Well, this review can be arbitrarily long, and I have to wrap up at some point. I just want to address one important issue - the book's name. In Russian, the book's name is "Voina i mir", which may mean "War and peace" but may also mean "War and society", since "peace" and "society" are homonyms in Russian. There are differences of opinion as to which Tolstoy actually meant when he authored the book, as you can read here or more at length here (Russian). Personally, I firmly believe that the "War and society" translation is more correct. It is very obvious that Tolstoy places a lot of emphasis on society in the book. Pierre compares his experiences in the society with his war adventures to form philosophical opinions. The same for Andrey. I can barely see any mention of peace in its "non-war" sense in the book.

 

 

Age rating: +14 years old

Book Publishers

# Logo Name Book cover Book weight Book dimensions ISBN
1 Vintage Vintage War and Peace 2.2 pounds 6.1 x 1.9 x 9.2 inches 978-1400079988
2 Penguin Classics Penguin Classics War and Peace 2.6 pounds 5.4 x 2 x 8 inches 978-0241265543
3 Everyman's Library Everyman's Library War and Peace 4.1 pounds 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.6 inches 978-0679405733
4 Oxford University Press Oxford University Press War and Peace 2.6 pounds 8.6 x 2.7 x 5.7 inches 978-0198800545
5 Dover Publications Dover Publications War and Peace 1.6 pounds 5 x 2 x 8 inches 978-0486816432

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